Milk – to boil or not to boil

A pitcher of fresh milk on the terraceWith so much questioning around the subject of milk, whether it’s good for you, if the alternatives are more digestible, are most people lactose intolerant etc etc. There is no doubt there is confusion. Here is the Ayurvedic perspective. Cows milk is considered to be the best and a complete food, providing unique nutrition with ‘saatvic’ qualities when it is digested properly, nourishing the body tissues, balancing the doshas and promoting emotional balance and ojas (a refined substance providing strength, immunity and contentment). With such nourishing properties why would we want to exclude milk from our diet?

Western research has found milk harmful largely due to their mode of intake. When milk is taken cold, unspiced, homogenized, combined with unsuitable foods and in excess, health concerns will prevail. The secret to milk as a healthy food lies in the way it is prepared and consumed.

First is it advisable to choose organic milk which does not contain hormones that are fed to cows to increase milk production. Traditionally, ayurveda recommends milk to be taken raw (not homogenized or pasteurised). In order to digest milk properly it should be brought to the boil for at least 5 minutes. The process of boiling changes the molecular structure of the milk, breaking down the milk proteins into digestible amino acids ensuring that it easier and lighter to digest, taken with spices such as cinnamon, cardamom, ginger, black pepper, turmeric can help reduce the accumulation of phlegm for kapha types and its cooling properties.

So we may argue that pasteurisation cleanses milk of bacteria, therefore it has already been ‘treated with heat’. However, it’s worth noting that the process does make the milk more digestible. The process of pasteurising is a treatment of milk to the temperature of 71.7 °C (161 °F) for 15–20 seconds which assists in the partial breakdown of milk proteins, making them very difficult to digest for the human system.

Furthermore, homogenization only serves to make it easier to pack, store and retail, benefiting only the organizations that want to make profit by retailing milk, and clearly overlooking the health issues. It is no wonder that there are so many complaints of milk intolerance and the switch to alternatives.

However it is safe to say that the cow’s milk whose virtues were praised by the ancient ayurvedic seers, is not the same milk that we are getting to consume today, so it will not have the same properties. We can do our level best to make informed choices to consume organic milk and undertake the process of boiling so we can still digest and get the best of what is available without having to substitute. Ayurveda also recommends goats milk, since it is less mucus forming and easier to digest than cow’s milk.

Milk should not be taken with incompatible foods such as fish, meat, fruits, foods that are sour, bitter, salty and astringent which can cause the build up of harmful toxins. Milk can however be taken with sweet tasting foods such as rice, dates and almonds. Boiled milk at night with spices can be a fantastic aid to sleep. Why not try the Geeta Vara Ayurveda ‘goodnight milk blend’.

Follow on twitter | Like on Facebook | Sign up for the newsletter

Contact Geeta Vara Ayurveda for an appointment for ayurvedic consultations and treatments

Advertisements

Ayurvedic Winter Warming Rice Kheer

One of the most common desserts is a very simple preparation of milk and rice, better known as Indian rice pudding. It is a wonderful nurturing dessert for the winter months at the same time being wholesome and vata pacifying.

Ingredients:Ayurvedic Rejuvenating Kheer
Pinch saffron (soaked in a little hot milk)
4 cups whole milk
¼ cup basmati rice (washed & drained)
1/4 tsp crushed cardamom seeds
2 tbsp blanched & sliced almonds
1 tbsp skinned & chopped pistachio nuts
1 tbsp raisins (optional)
2-3 tbsp raw cane sugar or honey (to taste)

Method:
Heat the rice milk and cardamom in a medium pan and bring to the boil, then simmer gently and keep stirring to prevent lumps. Wait until the rice is soft and start to break

Add the almonds, pistachio, saffron and raisins and simmer for a further 4-5 minutes

Add the sugar until dissolved according to taste. If you are adding honey add at time of serving (do not heat honey).

Remove from heat and serve while warm.

Follow on twitter | Like on Facebook | Sign up for the newsletter

Contact Geeta Vara Ayurveda for an appointment for ayurvedic consultations and treatments

New Year, New Ayurvedic Outlook

Ayurvedic Herbal TeasSo we are well into the new year and so many of us made a resolution to start a ‘detox’, lose the holiday weight, stop drinking and get back into the gym. How many of us actually last past the first few weeks or even the first few days? So many people fail to complete a detoxifcation cleanse in January as it does not fit in with their lifestyle, they are not mentally prepared and lets face it, there’s still plenty of indulgences lurking in the cupboards. But do not fear all is not doom and gloom, changing diets drastically during the winter months is not conducive to our overall health and according to Ayurveda the ideal time to go through a detoxification programme is in Spring time, so plenty of time to plan and prepare.

Ayurvedic advocates following a seasonal regime to support our well being, we are in the hemanta and shishira months (December to March) and our Agni (digestive fire) is at its strongest during these months, hence the tendency to feel increased hunger. The quest to lose weight can have an adverse affect on our metabolism at this time as we starve our body of essential nutrients.

Without radical dieting, we can adopt methods to pacify winter ailments such as fatigue, mental confusion, digestive problems, aches, pains and persistent cold while giving ourselves time to prepare for a deeper cleanse and weight loss in a more suitable season. Winter is essentially a vata and kapha period and a vata pacifying diet is most suitable.

  • Avoid the causative factors such as refined sugars, fried, leftover or cold foods saturated fats, and heavy dairy.
  • Eat foods that are naturally sweet, sour and salty by taste to help pacify vata dosha, such as soups, stews, hot teas and stewed fruits.
  • Favour foods that are wholesome and easy to digest including, carrots, tomatoes, figs, dates, cane sugar, nuts, seeds, seasonal root vegetables, wheat, gram flour, rice barley, rye, milk products, edible oils such as ghee and olive oil
  • Immunity is connected to digestion and when digestion is strong then immunity is robust, so drink warm/hot water and digestion enhancing spices such as ginger, cumin, coriander, cardamom and cinnamon. Strengthen your immune system with chywanprash, a jam packed full of immune boosting herbs.
  • Good news, Ayurveda says that a glass of warmed red wine can be and beneficial in winter, you can warm with cinnamon, cardamom, clove, ginger, fennel, nutmeg and black pepper
  • Opt for regular massage and hot or steam bath
  • Arise at 7am and take plenty of exercise to keep lymph moving and prevent congestion,
  • sexual activity is encouraged
  • Wear warm clothing of cottons, silks and wools.
  • Take exposure to sun when possible
  • Engage in calming meditation

Following a more natural regime will ensure that the body is able to cope with a detox and expel the toxins out of the body more effectively. Consult a practitioner for one to one guidance on your constitution and a personalised detox plan for the Spring.

Follow on twitter | Like on Facebook | Sign up for the newsletter

Contact Geeta Vara Ayurveda for an appointment for ayurvedic consultations and treatments

Stay cool this summer

Image

As we enter the height of the summer period, the pitta season, it is important to adapt our diet and lifestyle so we can keep our dosha in balance and enjoy the summer sun. Opposites are cure for opposites and therefore keeping in balance with nature will ensure that we are synchronised  with our environment.

Digestion is not as strong in the summer months and therefore it is best to opt for a light and easy to digest foods. Pitta is naturally increased especially in dominant people naturally due to the rise in heat. A pitta pacifying diet is most suitable with foods that are naturally sweet or bitter. These foods can include: asparagus, broccoli, artichoke, cucumber, green beans, courgettes, carrots, bitter gourd, bell peppers, kale, coconut, ghee, plums, pears, sweet grapes, figs, dates, melon, barley, cous cous, spelt, rice, all lentils. Avoid excess of nuts, heavy meats, salty, sour and pungent foods such as chillies, pickles, alcohol, fermented or fried foods.

During the summers months it is advisable to engage in calming activities such as walks in nature, and calming exercise such as yoga, tai chi, walking or swimming. Keep a cool and calm mind and take up the practice of regular meditation. Nurture yourself with a daily self massage, listen to calming music, eating is a peaceful environment. Wear gems and stones that have cooling properties such as moonstone, pearl, sapphire.

Protect yourself from the heat by wearing loose cotton clothing, protective sunglasses. Drink lots of room temperature water or lassi with some ground cumin for a refreshing and cool day drink.

Herbs that can be taken to reduce aggravated pitta can include: coriander, cilantro, cardamom, fennel, cumin, dill, mint, rose water, saffron.